Gallery – Cultivating Culture http://www.cultivatingculture.com Thinking and writing about culture around the world Sat, 13 Jan 2018 00:08:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 50009989 An Art Gallery for Those Aged 60+ http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2017/07/17/art-gallery-60/ Mon, 17 Jul 2017 21:29:19 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=5377 The world of gallery artists is a young world. Mostly, it is full of either the young outbreak star, or the middle-aged men who were young outbreak stars thirty years ago and have done nothing but commit their lives to art since. Marlena Vaccaro’s gallery is a craigy boulder in that youthful stream. Her space, […]

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Two elderly artists painting.

Photo credit: Shutterstock

The world of gallery artists is a young world. Mostly, it is full of either the young outbreak star, or the middle-aged men who were young outbreak stars thirty years ago and have done nothing but commit their lives to art since.

Marlena Vaccaro’s gallery is a craigy boulder in that youthful stream. Her space, the Carter Burden Gallery, has a strict policy. No artists under 60 need apply.

It’s not an issue that Vaccaro has invented; the agism of the art-world is well-documented. If an artist hasn’t had their big break by forty, it’s nearly impossible to get gallery space. Galleries claim they have to be able to sell the artist as much as their work, and an unknown who is also aged just isn’t marketable.

Which doesn’t leave any space on those gallery walls for the many, many artists who discovered time and talent together after their kids left the nest, or after their retirement.

One category that Vaccaro is specifically looking to show is the “re-emerging older artist.” Those who had lucky breaks in the art world thirty to forty years ago, but had to leave art for practicality and are only now returning.

The Burden Gallery’s model seems to be a valid one. Vaccaro says she receives about 25 portfolio submissions a month. Many are from artists too young to be eligible, but she keeps their names on file, marked with their 60th birthday. She’s still not lacking for eligible artists. In just a few years, the gallery has featured over 150 solo and group shows, and art sells from $425 to $9,000 a painting.

Vacarro’s gallery is backed by the Carter Burden Network, for which it is named. They provide aging services, mostly senior centers. The art gallery is a little outside of their usual wheelhouse, but the response from senior artists had made it clear that this is a service they were looking for.

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A Tribute To The Late Rosemary Mayer http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/12/05/rosemary-mayer-tribute/ Mon, 05 Dec 2016 17:59:42 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=5025 When Rosemary Mayer passed away in 2014 at the age of seventy-one, her obituary was a glowing list of accomplishments for any artist. She illustrated epic poems from throughout history, had solo exhibitions in galleries around the world, and received art grants from governments and private philanthropists alike. She taught art history for decades, and […]

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A drawing of a flower, pictured in black and white.

Image credit: Shutterstock

When Rosemary Mayer passed away in 2014 at the age of seventy-one, her obituary was a glowing list of accomplishments for any artist. She illustrated epic poems from throughout history, had solo exhibitions in galleries around the world, and received art grants from governments and private philanthropists alike. She taught art history for decades, and was a well-known and loved feature of the hoi polloi in her Tribeca neighborhood, a host of garden parties and elegant private exhibitions.

Mayer and her husband, Vito Acconi, have been influential in the New York art community since the late 60s, when they were experimenting with the art of the process, and also reviewing their fellow artists for Arts Magazine. Mayer was a founding member of A.I.R. Gallery, the United States’ first artist-run gallery co-op for women.

This month, Mayer’s contributions are being honored in a show of her art from those early busy days. The show, titled “Conceptual Works and Early Fabric Sculptures, 1969-1973,” will be at Southfirst Gallery in Brooklyn. The concise little retrospective will begin with her earliest works, a series of text projects on paper. Not writing, but rather typographical experiments, mostly words typed into expanding patterns, or colorful texts in graphs.

In gradual progression, Mayer’s works first introduce texture, and then abandon the page for textiles instead. The apex of the exhibition are two of her hand-dyed fabric sculptures, “Lady of the Mercians” and “The Catherines.” The last time either of them was shown was in A.I.R. Gallery, at its inaugural show.

“Conceptual Works etc,” is a loving tribute curated by two of the artist’s family members, Marie and Max Warsh together with curator Maika Pollack. It will be in Southfirst Gallery at 60 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, until December 11, 2016. Make sure you get down to there to see the artworks before it closesit’s unlikely that Mayer’s works will be shown together again soon, though her estate will be releasing a publication featuring excerpts from Mayer’s diary within the coming year.

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Cool Culture Pass http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/07/04/cool-culture-pass/ Mon, 04 Jul 2016 15:30:36 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4701 A collection of art museums recently commissioned a study to see the effects of their programs on students, and the results, after surveys of over 300 participants, were striking. Over three quarters of the participants rated their participation in museum programs as teenagers as one of the most positive influences on their lives, over family, […]

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A man helps a young student with an art project.

Image: Cool Culture

A collection of art museums recently commissioned a study to see the effects of their programs on students, and the results, after surveys of over 300 participants, were striking. Over three quarters of the participants rated their participation in museum programs as teenagers as one of the most positive influences on their lives, over family, school, and neighborhood culture. More than half called it the most important experience they’d ever had. Though that survey is small, museums across the country are already taking its results to heart.

A non-profit in New York is taking it one step further. If being involved with museums can be so positive to teenagers, they figure it will do all the more good to start them early. The non-profit, Cool Culture, is distributing 50,000 “Cool Culture Cards” to preschool and kindergarten students across New York, mostly through schools in low-income communities. Each card allows the child holder and up to four other people free entry to 90 of the city’s cultural centers, like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Botanical Garden, and the American Museum of Natural History.

The pass also comes with a great guide to getting the most out of a museum trip for children, a great aid to families who have not often had the opportunity.

Cool Culture isn’t alone in the effort, though their pass is the best deal. The Association of Children’s Museums runs a more widespread program called “Museums for All” that offers reduced admission to students who qualify for free or reduced lunch, and other cities around the country have their own programs. (For example: Many of Seattle’s museums offer free admission to all on the first Thursday of every month.)

Children who have regular access to museums are going to become more culturally aware adults, able to have the kinds of conversations that result in a lifelong ability to learn and grow. Historically, financial and class barriers have kept low-income kids from these institutions, but as these programs are proving, we can turn that around.

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5 Smithsonian Exhibits to Check out This Summer http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/07/01/5-smithsonian-exhibits/ Fri, 01 Jul 2016 15:30:12 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4697 The Smithsonian Institution was established in 1846 and is currently the world’s largest museum and research complex. Consisting of 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park, and nine research facilities, its mission is to shape the future by preserving our heritage, discovering new knowledge, and sharing their resources with the world. A number of […]

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The Smithsonian museum on a sunny day.

Marco Rubino / Shutterstock.com

The Smithsonian Institution was established in 1846 and is currently the world’s largest museum and research complex. Consisting of 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park, and nine research facilities, its mission is to shape the future by preserving our heritage, discovering new knowledge, and sharing their resources with the world.

A number of Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo are free to the public and open every day of the year except December 25. From public art pieces, street, modern, experimental or contemporary art, viewing opportunities are endless this summer.

Be sure to check out these five Smithsonian exhibits this season:

Exhibit: Energizing the Everyday: Gifts from the George Kravis II Collection
Museum: Cooper Hewitt (New York)
Price: $16 for adults

The “Energizing the Everyday” exhibit focuses on the collecting vision of George Kravis in New York’s Cooper Hewitt museum, with more than 100 pieces on display dating from the early 20th century to the present. From industrial design to furniture to tableware and textiles, the exhibit creates visual and material connections across time and geography. The exhibit is available to view through March 2017.

Exhibit: Through the African American Lens: Selections from the Permanent Collection
Museum: National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington D.C.)
Price: Free

“Through the African American Lens” walks us into the dynamic history of Americans of African descent, showcasing the personal narratives of diverse families, organizations, and individuals throughout the Revolutionary era to the present. The exhibit highlights the monumental milestones that mark African American history and celebrates the achievements and contributions of individuals in the community that helped shape the United States.

Exhibit: Apollo to the Moon
Museum: National Air and Space Museum (Washington D.C.)
Price: Free

The Apollo program was designed to launch humans to the Moon and bring them safely back to earth. By the time the program ended, it had taken the efforts of more than half a million people, producing the most powerful and largest rockets ever built.  “Apollo to the Moon” features a display of artifacts from Apollo (and earlier missions), including the F-1 rocket engine, spacesuits worn by the astronauts, a space flight time line, and more.

Exhibit: E Mau Ke Ea: The Sovereign Hawaiian Nation
Museum: National Museum of the American Indian (Washington D.C.)
Price:  Free

Did you know that Hawaii was an independent kingdom until 1983, when non-Native businessmen conquered the monarchy and announced themselves the new government?  “E Mau Ke Ea: The Sovereign Hawaiian Nation” walks us through the history of the Hawaiian nation, from the alliance of the islands in 1810 to the rise of the Hawaiian rights movement in the late 1960s.  Visitors of the exhibit will leave with a richer understanding of the Kingdom of Hawaii, embracing western innovations and Polynesian identity.

Exhibit: WONDER
Museum: Renwick Gallery (Washington D.C.)
Price: Free

The Renwick Gallery opened its doors on November 2015 after a major two-year renovation. To celebrate, they transformed the museum into WONDER, their debut exhibit. Nine contemporary artists – Gabriel Dawe, Jennifer Angus, Chakaia Booker, Patrick Dougherty, Tara Donovan, John Grade, Janet Echelman, Maya Lin, and Leo Villareal – each managed different galleries in the building, creating installations inspired by the Renwick. These installations turned the building into a larger-than-life piece of art. Do you wonder what they created? The second-floor galleries closed on May 8, 2016; however, you have until July 10, 2016 to view the first-floor galleries.

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David Shrigley’s “Memorial” http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/06/06/david-shrigleys-memorial/ Mon, 06 Jun 2016 21:37:28 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4660 David Shrigley has a reputation for art that is usually a joking riff on everyday themes. Like a pair of rebar lovers coupling on a car hood, or a Darth (Dar) Vader mask with huge googly eyes. But much of his art has meaning just below the surface, like his large quilted lettuce leaf pocked […]

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An aerial view of Central Park on a sunny day.

Image: Central Park | Shutterstock

David Shrigley has a reputation for art that is usually a joking riff on everyday themes. Like a pair of rebar lovers coupling on a car hood, or a Darth (Dar) Vader mask with huge googly eyes. But much of his art has meaning just below the surface, like his large quilted lettuce leaf pocked with cigarette burns – an ode to the many women who have had to make dinner and do first aid on themselves at the same time.

MEMORIAL, the Shrigley piece earmarked for Central Park this fall, falls between these on the meaningful spectrum. Memorial will be a 17-foot-tall slab of granite, memorializing the most every-day of scraps, the shopping list.

“A 2016 grocery list is different than one written just a few decades ago. Its ephemerality, including the fact that it is often written on a scrap of paper or a smartphone, is in sharp contrast with Shrigley’s selection of material—a solid slab of granite—on which to engrave these banal words,” explained Emma Enderby, Public Art Fund associate curator. The Public Art Fund of NYC is who chose to erect MEMORIAL.

MEMORIAL is not a new work by Shrigley, strictly speaking. It is a sized-up version of his 2008 sculplture Gravestone, with a few variations.

The sculpture will go up the Doris C. Freedman Plaza in Central Park on September 8, with no planned end date. Fans of Shrigley can see his work in the same month at his exhibition “David Shrigley: Life Model II” at the Rose Art Museum in Massachusetts.

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SFMOMA Finally Opens! http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/05/20/sfmoma-finally-opens/ Fri, 20 May 2016 19:30:22 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4630 It’s a monumental week in the arts community. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, previously closed for two years while the museum underwent massive construction, renovation, and addition, has finally opened its sparkly new doors to the public. Three years and $305 million have made for a museum that is rich, beautiful, and that’s […]

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An enormous Richard Serra sculpture at the new SFMOMA.

Image: An enormous spiraling sculpture by Richard Serra at the museum’s new entrance. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times | NY Times

It’s a monumental week in the arts community. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, previously closed for two years while the museum underwent massive construction, renovation, and addition, has finally opened its sparkly new doors to the public. Three years and $305 million have made for a museum that is rich, beautiful, and that’s setting a new standard for art museums around the world.

The newly-renovated museum includes generous donations and loans from high-powered art collectors like Thomas Weisel, who loaned a 1953 triptych by abstract painter Lee Mullican, and Donald and Doris Fisher.

The museum has opened with an incredible 19 inaugural exhibitions and 1,900 works on display. There is a new exhibit dedicated entirely to photography, the first exhibit of its kind, and a gallery of photos from famed photographer Diane Arbus. There are four galleries for the work of Ellsworth Kelly alone.

The museum was designed by Norwegian firm Snøhetta, and its interior does not disappoint. Included in the design are a multipurpose performance space, two restaurants, a third floor for the massive photography exhibit (that also includes a coffee bar!), and terraces that have lovely views of sculptures. A new amphitheater looks across the likewise new Howard Street entrance.

Saturday, May 14th, museum director Neal Benezra punched a button, and ten tons of red confetti was let loose from the roof of the new building. Drum corps signified the museum’s opening, and people were allowed in to see the galleries for the first time. For the time being, entrance to the museum is free, as a way to attract visitors to the museum. However, tickets are given in timed batches to keep traffic low. The $25 fee for nonmembers was waived, and all 5,000 tickets were claimed in just a few hours. Most people elected to stay in the new museum until it closed.

People generally responded well to the opening and the new galleries. “In addition to being a fantastic museum, the SFMOMA is a piece of art in itself,” said Linda Hofstad Helleland, Norway’s minister of culture, who traveled from home to see SFMOMA open. “It’s a great day for Norway.”

Bob Fisher, president of the SFMOMA board of trustees, agrees. “Now we’ve got to do what we set out to do: to bring art to more people,” he said.

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Mary Mattingly, Boulders, and the Police http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/05/06/mary-mattingly-boulders-police/ Fri, 06 May 2016 15:32:39 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4614 A woman pushing a boulder as big as she is, made of household things and yellow twine across the Bayonne Bridge from Staten Island to New Jersey–while not technically illegal–attracts police attention. Which is how one of Mary Mattingly’s performance sculptures wound up: with a few cop cameos in the video. She kept them in […]

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An art piece by Mary Mattingly in which a trash boulder sits on top of a naked woman.

Image: Life of Objects, 2013 | Mary Mattingly

A woman pushing a boulder as big as she is, made of household things and yellow twine across the Bayonne Bridge from Staten Island to New Jersey–while not technically illegal–attracts police attention. Which is how one of Mary Mattingly’s performance sculptures wound up: with a few cop cameos in the video. She kept them in it.

The videos of her pushing the big faux boulders around are a performance piece, a statement on the over-consumption common to American life. Much of her work investigates this theme, in fact.

The boulders are not rolling around New York and New Jersey now, of course. They stand in state in her exhibit, ‘Mass and Obstruction,” in Light Work Gallery. There are about half a dozen of them. The smallest is about the size of a microwave. The largest, about eight feet tall. They’re made of utterly everyday objects. Cassette tapes, books, clothing, garden hoses, all balled up in rope and twine.

Alongside the boulders are photo-manipulations, videos, and maps, each with their own message about consumption and greed.

Mary Lee Hodgens, curator of the exhibit, said that it was difficult to choose which pieces to display, because Mattingly is prolific and has, ironically, hoarded up quite a few works. She appreciates Mattingly’s work for the questions it inevitably inspires in visitors.

“It’s a pile of trash. It’s a massive pile of trash. Why would you ever want that much trash?” Hodgens said. “Where are you going with your trash? Are you keeping your trash? Are you storing your trash?”

“The artist is saying, ‘What are we doing with all this trash?’” Hodgens said

Mattingly’s boulder-rolling wasn’t her first foray into performance art. In 2014, she built a houseboat on an old barge and lived aboard for six months, eventually turning the whole vessel into a self-sufficient little farm which she titled “The Waterpod.” It visited all five boroughs of New York City.

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David Geffen Donates $100 Million to the Museum of Modern Art http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/05/04/david-geffen-100-million-moma/ Wed, 04 May 2016 15:30:42 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4611 Billionaire and philanthropist David Geffen, considered one of the world’s top art collectors, has made a generous gift of $100 million to New York’s Museum of Modern Art. The funds will go to its newest expansion project, and so far Geffen’s donation is the largest in the museum’s campaign to raise money for its $440 […]

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David Geffen.

Image: David Geffen | Patrick McMullan | New York Times

Billionaire and philanthropist David Geffen, considered one of the world’s top art collectors, has made a generous gift of $100 million to New York’s Museum of Modern Art. The funds will go to its newest expansion project, and so far Geffen’s donation is the largest in the museum’s campaign to raise money for its $440 million project. Three floors of its new galleries will be called the Geffen Wing in honor of his donation.

“These are the kinds of gifts you only dream about,” said Glenn D. Lowry, director of MOMA.

Geffen’s gift will be paid for over time, but it will happen quickly, the museum said. Renovations and expansions to the museum, which includes a gray-area demolition of the American Folk Art Museum, is expected to be completed by 2019 or 2020.

Geffen’s art collection is itself a true piece of art: it has an estimated value of $2 billion, a significant part of his $6.8 billion net worth. A longtime admirer of the museum, Geffen said, “When I worked in the mailroom at the William Morris agency I used to brown bag it at the sculpture garden of the Museum of Modern Art. It’s where I developed my interest in post-World War II art.” Additionally, he has long enjoyed other kinds of art, having made his wealth through pop music, art, and movies.

He has donated many artworks to MOMA over the years and lending pieces from his own collections for important museum exhibitions. A few months ago, Geffen sold two artworks, one Pollock and one de Kooning, to Ken Griffin, a hedge fund manager, for $500 million, in one of the largest art deals ever. Last year, he gave $100 million to the Lincoln Center, which then named its largest concert hall after him.

In 2002, Geffen donated a whopping $200 million to the UCLA School of Medicine, now named the David Geffen School of Medicine, which was the largest donation ever made to a medical school.

“I intend to give away as much of my money as possible whim I’m alive to things that I think are valuable,” said Geffen, who has no dependents. “So far, it’s a considerable amount of money.”

So what happens to his expansive art collection? It will ultimately go to his own foundation to be given to other institutions or sold, and the proceeds would go to culture, medicine, or education causes.

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De Young Museum Offers Unique Experience for Apple Watch Users http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/04/15/de-young-museum-apple-watch/ Fri, 15 Apr 2016 19:30:35 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4576 San Francisco’s de Young Museum has a new, innovative way for visitors to experience the museum.  The project was created by Guidekick, a startup and expansion of the de Young’s phone app. There are plenty of great things to see at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, including southwestern Native American art donated by […]

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A visitor holds up an Apple Watch at the Oscar de la Renta retrospective at the de Young Museum.

Image: A visitor holds up an Apple Watch at the Oscar de la Renta retrospective at the de Young Museum.

San Francisco’s de Young Museum has a new, innovative way for visitors to experience the museum.  The project was created by Guidekick, a startup and expansion of the de Young’s phone app.

There are plenty of great things to see at the de Young Museum in San Francisco, including southwestern Native American art donated by businessman Thom Weisel and a current retrospective on fashion designer Oscar de la Renta. When visitors pass the fashion exhibit, the Apple Watch will vibrate to let people know there’s an audio track they can listen to. If users choose to listen, they can hear the designer himself talk about his work and influences.

The app will use a Bluetooth component to narrow down exactly where visitors in the museum are so it can alert them to audio options. Then, with headphones, visitors can explore a part of the museum they wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

The de Young Museum is one of the first to use watches—or wearables—like this, though many museums offer audio companions. The watch is meant to act as a kind of “invisible tour guide,” says Richard Benefield, active director and chief operations officer at the de Young. The “guide” can provide guests with information about the different exhibits without being a distraction to them—it’s kind of like an on-demand educational service, only put into use when necessary.

The new Apple Watch technology was announced by the company earlier this week at the de Young. The event was for a host of companies and builders putting together apps very like this one, bringing technology to art and vice versa.

The museum hopes to offer more services like this one in the future, and there are likely to be more opportunities, as San Francisco is very close to Silicon Valley. Benefield has encouraged others to approach the museum with innovative ideas.

“I’ve made it known to Silicon Valley: our museum is your laboratory,” he said.

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Pulling an All-Nighter: Art Night Comes to London http://www.cultivatingculture.com/2016/04/08/art-night-comes-to-london/ Fri, 08 Apr 2016 15:30:37 +0000 http://www.cultivatingculture.com/?p=4562 People are going to do what people are going to do. If that means one night, people go see art in strange places at, say, 3:12 AM, then so be it. For one such night, people will be able to go see works of art and installations around London in public and private spaces, including in […]

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Southwark Cathedral after dusk.

Southwark Cathedral, the only Art Night venue south of the river. Photograph: Bolton & Quinn | The Guardian

People are going to do what people are going to do. If that means one night, people go see art in strange places at, say, 3:12 AM, then so be it. For one such night, people will be able to go see works of art and installations around London in public and private spaces, including in a spooky, abandoned platform that’s no longer in use. Art Night will launch in July and invites people all over to come see art at a dark hour of their choosing.

Though the official goings-on won’t happen until later this summer, Art Night did launch this weekend at a house near the Strand that belonged to Samuel Johnson. Plenty of art exhibits will go up for display all over down, including installations, film and dance, and a large exercise class held by Chinese artist Xu Zhen at the Somerset House. This all comes to fruition barely a month before the tube offers an all-night service, making it easier for people to get where they’re going anytime.

Art Night promises at least 10 projects at some incredible venues, including 190 Strand, which is in the process of being converted into very expensive apartments, expecting to sell for between 1.5 and 9.5 million pounds. Art will also be shown at the Admiralty Arch, of John Prescott fame, which will soon be made into a hotel.

The aforementioned abandoned tube station, the platform at Charing Cross underground station, will hold art from South Korean artist Koo Jeong-a as part of a joint commission with Art on the Underground. Jazz pianist Jason Moran and artist Joan Jonas will display their works at Southwark Cathedral.

All art events will be free, but indoor events will require tickets to help stave off long lines and presumably the chaos of the witching hour. Other cities that have created similar art nights have suffered long waits and crowds, and hopefully they will learn from London’s version.

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